The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse announces mandatory reporting seminar

A mandatory reporting seminar will be held on 27 September 2018. Its aim is to gather information and views on whether mandatory reporting should be introduced as a response to child sexual abuse.  The seminar will invite key individuals with valued insight in the subject and will examine the issues, concerns and practical implications of mandatory reporting.  Continue reading

Internet Watch Foundation publishes its Annual Report

The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) works to identify and remove online images and videos of child sexual abuse. Their aim is to make the internet a safer place by removing the availability of online sexual abuse content.

On 18 April 2018 they published their 2017 Annual Report, here we look at some of the trends that they have identified and their valuable work in tackling online images of child sexual abuse. Continue reading

Identification and disclosure of child abuse

Identifying child sexual abuse especially in an institutional setting is the first and often most important step in protecting children and preventing its re-occurrence.

It is not sufficient just to educate children to recognise behaviours that constitute sexual abuse, and instruct them to tell someone if they are abused. Instead, adults also need to be attuned to signs of harm in children and equipped to identify signs of possible sexual abuse. Adults and the wider community need to better understand the dynamics of sexual abuse and how to recognise grooming tactics, and to notice emotional and behavioural changes in children.

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Managing expectations

Recent developments across the jurisdictions have highlighted the difficulties faced by all those involved in dealing with abuse allegations.  The number and expectations of the different people involved presents significant problems in handling these matters in a professional yet sensitive way.

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IICSA – finances

The IICSA has published details of the salary of Prof Jay and the cost of the Inquiry to date (£14.73m). As expected the salary is lower than that of Dame Goddard. More surprisingly the first year budget of £17.2m was not all spent and the surplus was returned to the Home Office. This surplus may be due to good financial housekeeping or possibly because progress was not made in certain previously anticipated areas. One such area may be the lack of a permanent location for the hearings to proceed or because it has taken longer to reach the current stage and so hearings have not yet been possible.

Prof Jay’s salary will be £185,000pa, just over half of the sum to Dame Goddard and without all the additional costs. The two largest cost elements of the Inquiry to date have been staffing and legal costs. These were followed by Estates and Information Technology. No details have been given of the budget for the next year but it is fair to assume that at least a similar sum will be spent as the case studies and hearings proceed.


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Paula Jefferson, Partner

Home Affairs Committee – IICSA

Today the Home Affairs Committee heard oral evidence from the Rt Hon Amber Rudd MP, Home Secretary, and Mark Sedwill, Permanent Secretary, Home Office regarding the work of the Home Secretary. Dame Lowell Goddard who had been invited to attend did not and sent a memo (reported on yesterday) specifying her reasons for her resignation.

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IICSA internal review but no change in scope

As Amber Rudd is due to attend before the Home Affairs Select Committee tomorrow and a memo from the former Chair is commented on in the press, the new Chair has made a statement announcing an internal review. However there is no change to terms of reference or the introduction of any new restrictions on the scope of the Inquiry.

Professor Jay has ‎said hat she has initiated a wide-ranging internal review of the Inquiry’s ways of working and they are looking at different approaches to evaluating the information received. To date the Inquiry has received over 500,000 pages of evidence.

The full statement from Professor Jay can be accessed here.


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Paula Jefferson, Partner